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AFA References with Abstracts

  AFA Abstracts

 
Advanced Flying Automobile (AFA) LS1 Engine Study

This paper describes the results of a study determining the feasiblity of a reciprocating automotive engine for the Advanced Flying Automobile (AFA). Reliable proven automotive engines are preferred because of the high cost of certified aircraft engines and the technological gap created over the past fifty years of manufacturing know-how. This research effort summarizes knowledge required to convert the Corvette LS1 engine for highway and flight applications. Study concludes the LS1 engine is practical for the AFA design.

SAE Paper No. 1999-01-5644

Mike Czajkowski, AFA Co.

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Private Air Transportation with AFA and Roadable Aircrafts and Impact on Intercity and Metropolitan Infrastructures

This study explores the travel time savings a dual mode vehicle could realize over conventional transportation systems.  It shows that for inter-city and intra-city distances greater than 50 miles, dual mode systems would reduce door to door travel time up to 70%. The study utilizes "travel time expense" and "value of time" to compare conventional transportation systems to dual mode vehicles.

SAE Paper Number 985536

AFA Co. in collaboration with California State University, Long Beach

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Telescopic Wing for an AFA

This paper describes results of NASA SBIR Phase I program determining the feasilbility of a composite telescopic wing for a roadable aircraft. The project titled "Design and Manufacture of a Deployable Highly Loaded Airfoil Structure" analyzes the claims of U.S. Patent No. 4,824,053 and a fabricated one-half scale Functionality Model. The Functionality Model (consisting of three segments) represents one quarter of a full size wing. The research effort compiled the basic knowledge required to design, produce, and certify a composite telescopic wing. Preliminary structural analysis and the Functionality Model show that telescopic principles are practical for deployable, highly loaded airfoil structures. Furthermore, this emerging technology has potential for a wide range of applications including Advanced Flying Automobiles, civil aviation, military air transportation, and space exploration.

SAE Paper No. 975602

AFA Co. in collaboration with California State University, Long Beach

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SBIR Phase I: Design and Manufacture of a Deployable Highly Loaded Airfoil Structure

The objectives of this research effort included the preliminary design of a telescopic wing and fabrication of a deployable, half scale Functionality Model demonstrating motion characteristics and drive system principles. This work describes the wing configuration for all major components and completed the preliminary design, material and stress analysis for primary structural components. Material analysis evaluated basic material alternatives for primary wing elements and drive kinematics. The structural analysis determined load distribution for various spar diameters and down selected an optimum alternative. Considering these loads, stress levels for all segments of the wing were calculated and critical cross sections identified. The half scale, three segment Functionality Model successfully demonstrates the research objectives. The Phase I research effort and objectives were acheived, in cooperation with many industrial/scholastic supporters and culminated in a successful test of a Functionality Model, demonstrating the highest degree of performance.

Research sponsored by NASA-Langley Research Center

AFA Co.

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Quarter Scale Functionality Model of an AFA

This project's goal was to manufacture a quarter scale, fully automated Advanced Flying Automobile. The model demonstrates the automatic deployment and retraction of all flight components for the conversion between automotive and aircraft configurations. The wings, vertical stabilizers, horizontal stabilizers, propeller, and wheels are activated by push-button controls. The model has been shown at conferences, media events, and other activities.

AFA Co. in collaboration with California State University, Long Beach

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Potential Business Opportunities with a High Speed Personal Transportation System

This study analyzes and compares the business characteristics and performance data of commercial aviation, general aviation, and automotive transportation systems to dual mode vehicles. Travel times, travel costs, and market forces of conventional systems are used to identify the potential market niche of dual mode systems. The advantages and disadvantages of each transportation system are discussed.

Dr. Branko Sarh, AFA Co. Study

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Design and Styling Study for an AFA

Conducted by Merkel Weiss from the Pasadena Art Center College of Design, this study focused on styling and design of an Advanced Flying Automobile. Driver/vehicle interaction with the instruments, controls, seating, and visibility are considered. Renderings were made to show mechanical systems, suspension, and cockpit design.

Merkel Weiss, Pasadena Art Center College of Design

SAE Publication

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Wind Tunnel Testing of an AFA Concept

A 1:12 scale model based on the Advanced Flying Automobile concept was examined in the San Diego State University Low Speed Wind Tunnel for perfomance and stability characteristics. A wind tunnel model was fabricated and tested for lift and drag characteristics. Three different wing positions along the fuselage axis were examined. With proper wing position, sufficient lift and in-flight stability are achievable.

SAE Paper No. 942173

Ken Pierson, Greg McCarthy, and Rich Evans

California State University, San Diego

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Steering Mechanism of an AFA

The study describes the design and integration of automotive controls with the aircraft inflight controls. This challenging task requires an innovative approach (e.g. front wheel steering with the aileron control using the automotive type steering wheel). The adaptation of elevator control with the steering wheel as well as the layout of the rudder, brake, and accelerator peddles were considered, and practical solutions proposed.

SAE Paper No. 942182

Mike Czajkowski, AFA Co.

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Wheel Suspension of an AFA

Principles and important parameters for design of landing gears for general aviation airplanes and suspensions for automobiles are described. A comparison between automobile, aircraft, and Advanced Flying Automobile design requirements reveals that a new generation of suspension has to be developed to gain the flexibility, efficiency, and high kinetic energy absorption capability needed for an AFA suspension system.

SAE Paper No. 942183

Dr. Branko Sarh, AFA Co.

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Design Methodology and Infrastructures for Flying Automobiles

This paper addresses the design principles inherent in previous flying automobiles and describes needed methodology for the development of future more advanced flying automobile concepts, emphasizing customers' needs and system requirements. The general aviation industry was analyzed and reasons for their stagnation discussed. A proposal for a new private transportation system encompassing ground guided airways and its advantages for the private future air transportation are presented.

SAE Paper No. 932604

Dr. Branko Sarh, AFA Co.

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